Kickstarter is a site that has really attracted a lot of attention. If you’re feeling stuck on the whole social lending thing and you really want to get noticed — come to this site. It’s gaining enough attention to the point where if you honestly need to get seen, you have to come here with your project. Yet not all projects are created equal. Indeed, if you really haven’t gotten your product specific enough, then you’re not going to be able to get the funding that you need.

Kickstarter is all about having things specific. It’s about funding projects that actually do something for the world. So this means that if you’re just trying to get your debts paid in terms of a debt consolidation loan, this isn’t the site for you. However, if you’re raising money to build a local magazine for your town, then you can bring your project to Kickstarter. So let’s use that example for this guide, shall we?

If you’re going to sell this project to people, you need to get super social about it. You need to ideally also have your own Facebook page so you can connect with people there as well. Answer any and all questions about the project itself.


The trouble with Kickstarter is that there’s no way to really verify which projects are legit and which projects aren’t. Some lenders have caught onto that, and that means that they will be looking at your project in a very different way — will they really be funding something worthwhile? That’s why you want to pile on the credibility factors.

Video is a great way to do that. You will be able to connect with your audience and really convince them that you are a real project. Having a solid website filled with tons of information is the best way to go. You don’t want to just try to slide on doing the minimum amount of work. That will not get your proposal funded.

As a side note, you will not get your project funded unless you get the entire proposal filled. That’s one of the downsides to Kickstarter — there’s no way to get a partial loan. It’s really an all or nothing thing. The good news is that once you do get your proposal funded, you don’t have anyone standing over you telling you exactly where to spend the money. As long as you update your crowd on what’s being done, they’re going to be pretty satisfied.

This site is a bit different from social lending sites because it’s really more about donating to a cause you believe in (a project) rather than getting a loan from someone else. Either way, it does match the merits of social lending enough that we felt it best to include it here.

If you really want to make the most of this site, you would also do well to add some bonuses and incentives. If people donate a certain level of money, you will do something cool for them. That’s pretty cool, right?

As far as the “extras” designed to raise views of your project, that’s really hit or miss. You might want to Google other people’s experiences on Kickstarter and work in their tips — after all, they’ve already been where you want to be, so why wouldn’t you? Good luck!